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[la]

1. feminine noun Wool.

Etymology: From Latin lana.

2. masculine noun Country, land.

Etymology: From English land.

vaina

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[ˈvai̯na]

1. feminine noun Vagina.

Etymology: From Latin vagina.

2. feminine noun Vein.

Etymology: From Latin vena.

-ant

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[ant]

1. derivative suffix Added to the stem of a verb, it derives the corresponding noun or adjective. Example: discendre (verb), to descend, discendant (noun), descendant; stimowăre (verb), to stimulate, stimowant (adjective), stimulating.

Etymology: From Latin -ante.

2. derivative suffix Added to the stem of a verb, it derives the corresponding gerund (present participle). Example: chantre, to sing, chantant, singing.

Etymology: From Latin -andu.

seix

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[seʃ]

1. masculine noun Sex.

Etymology: From Latin sexus.

2. numeral Six.

Etymology: From Latin sex.

gouf

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[gou̯f]

1. masculine noun Gulf.

Etymology: From Latin colphus.

2. masculine noun Golf.

Etymology: From English golf.

sa

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[sa]

1. possessive determiner, feminine singular His, her, its.

2. possessive pronoun, feminine singular His, hers, its.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into sal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For masculine plural: sas; for feminine forms, see sou.

Etymology: From Latin sua.

[sa]

1. adjective Healthy.

Etymology: From Latin sanus.

sou

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[sou̯]

1. possessive determiner, masculine singular His, her, its.

2. possessive pronoun, masculine singular His, hers, its.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into soul’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For masculine plural: sous; for feminine forms, see sa.

Etymology (1-2): From Latin suus.

3. preposition Under, below. Example: Ous cjudes scondeiren-si sou ou llit, the children hid under the bed.

Etymology (3): From Latin sub.

sou-

[sou̯]

1. derivative prefix Added to a word, it means beneath, of inferior quality or lesser importance. Examples: nòrmal, normal, sounòrmal, mentally handicapped; ridre, to laugh, sourridre, to smile; ggulopat, developed, souggulopat, underdeveloped.

Etymology: From Latin sub.

cout

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[kou̯t]

1. adjective Cultured, educated.

Etymology: From Latin cultus.

2. masculine noun Elbow.

Etymology: From Latin cubitus.

ta

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[ta]

1. possessive determiner, feminine singular Your.

2. possessive pronoun, feminine singular Yours.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into tal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For masculine plural: tas; for feminine forms, see tou.

Etymology: From Latin tua.

-tà

[ta]

1. derivative suffix Added to an adjective, it derives the corresponding noun. This noun is of feminine gender and makes its plural in -tatas. It sometimes adds an intermediate -i- vowel. Example: ouscur (adjective), dark, ouscurità (noun), darkness; aintïu (adjective), antique, aintjutà (noun), antiquity.

Etymology: From Latin -tate.

si

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[si]

1. conditional conjunction If, in case.

Etymology: From Latin si.

2. adverb of affirmation Yes.

Etymology: From Latin sic.

~ bain

[si bai̯n]

1. concessive conjunction Although. Example: Si bain ill hast façat grãns progreixes, tuvïe nõn hast ou nivell su fizant, although he has made a great improvement, he is not up to the standard yet.