-ata

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[ˈata]

1. Derivative suffix Added to a noun, it derives a new noun with a meaning of hit, set or content. Example: semain, semen, semainata, seed; petra, stone, petrata, hit from a stone.

Etymology: From Latin -ata.

2. Derivative suffix Feminine version of the derivative suffix -at, corresponding to a participle.

Etymology: From -at plus feminine derivative suffix -a.

os

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[os]

1. masculine noun Bone.

Etymology: From Latin ossum.

-òs

[os]

1. derivative suffix Added to a noun or an adjective, it derives a new adjective with a meaning of abundance. Example: pes (noun), weight, pesòs (adjective), heavy; verd (adjective), green, verdòs (adjective), greenish.

Etymology: From Latin -osus.

fama

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[ˈfama]

1. feminine noun Woman.

Etymology: From Latin femina via French femme.

2. feminine noun Fame.

Etymology: From Latin fama.

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[re]

1. feminine noun Net, network, mesh.

Etymology: From Latin rete.

-re

[re]

1. derivative suffix Added to the stem of a verb, it derives the corresponding infinitive. Example: coinoç-, coinoçre, to know.

Spelling: For weak verbs, it turns into -ăre, pronounced [əɾe]. Example: crej-, crejăre, to create.

Etymology: From Latin -are.

sentre

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[ˈsentɾe]

1. transitive verb To feel.

2. transitive verb To be sorry about, to regret.

Etymology (1-2): From Latin sentire.

3. transitive verb To sit (to make a person sit).

Etymology (3): From Latin sedentare.

-ment

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[ment]

1. derivative suffix Added to a feminine adjective, it derives the corresponding adverb. It is equivalent to -ly in English. Example: ràpid, quick, ràpidament, quickly.

Etymology: From Latin mente.

2. derivative suffix Added to the stem of a verb, it derives a new noun. It means action or effect. Example: sentre (verb), to feel, sentament (noun), feeling.

Etymology: From Latin –mentum.

ma

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[ma]

1. possessive determiner, feminine singular My.

2. possessive pronoun, feminine singular Mine.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into mal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For masculine plural: mas; for feminine forms, see mou.

Etymology: From Latin mea.

[ma]

1. feminine noun Hand.

Etymology: From Latin manus.

illa

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[ˈiʎa]

1. personal pronoun, feminine singular She (subject), her (object, only after a preposition).

Etymology: From ill plus the feminine suffix -a.

2. feminine noun Island, isle.

Etymology: From Latin insula.

se

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[se]

1. personal pronoun, singular It is used in impersonal sentences (weather, existence, etc.) as a formal subject to compensate the lack of it. The corresponding verb is always conjugated in the third person of singular. Examples: se njeixe, it is snowing.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into s’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces).

Etymology: From Latin se.

[se]

1. feminine noun Thirst.

Etymology: From Latin sitis.

 

da

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[da]

1. demonstrative determiner, feminine singular This.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into dal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For feminine plural: das; for masculine forms, see dou (1).

2. demonstrative pronoun, feminine singular This one.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into dal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For feminine plural: das; for masculine  forms, see dou (2).

Etymology (1-2): A portmonteau between German das (this) and the definite article a (2).

3. preposition-article contraction, feminine singular Of the.

Spelling: Before words beginning with a vowel or h-, it turns into dal’, with word ligature (both words are written together without intermediate spaces). For feminine plural: das; for masculine forms, see dou (3).

Etymology: From de a.